How to Scare the Shit out of a QA Person in 3 Easy Steps


Google Chrome (and now also Firefox 4) have the useless little feature of allowing the user to resize any on a page. I’ve found the perfect use case for it: 1. Go to a page in your website that contains a , like my Delver profile page: 2. Drag the corner of the until reaching a particularly obnoxious appearance: 3. Now make a screenshot and send an email to your favorite QA person.…
Read more ⟶

Code Sample: Consuming the Twitter Streaming API


.code {background-color: rgb(205, 205, 205); font-family: lucida console;} Here’s a c# example of consuming the Twitter Streaming API. Suppose you want to take all Tweets mentioning a country and save it to a database. I will be using the Twitterizer c# library. Let’s first look at the complete code and then walk through it: private static bool streamEnded = false; public static void HandleStream() { DateTime end = DateTime.Now + TimeSpan.…
Read more ⟶

8 Tips for Specs that Work


Here are some tips for creating more useful software specs that I gathered from my experience working on Delver. Note: these are mostly relevant for specs that deal with user-facing features, but some apply in general. Tell a story Try to structure your document as a story that describes what the user does in the same sequence users are going to do it in the eventual system. This conveys the experience better than just describing different pages and functions as standalone objects.…
Read more ⟶

Twitter API .Net Libraries Roundup


Out of the few Twitter API libraries for .net out there, the ones that seem most complete are: Twitterizer and TweetSharp. I’ve been developing with both in the past couple of weeks and both are generally stable, complete and provide a clean one-per-one wrapper for the Twitter API methods. Which is great news (tm). TweetSharp currently does not support the Streaming API, which is a major drawback and the reason why I am sticking with Twitterizer for now.…
Read more ⟶

I Told You So (fflick)


I hate saying “I told you so”… ;) 5 months ago I tweeted: And yesterday it was announced that Google is buying fflick.…
Read more ⟶

Move Along, Nothing to See Here, I am Invisible!


Well, this is just too lame. This little window was just hanging around my desktop: “Peculiar” I thought. But you can’t fool me. I dragged the edge of the window to *resize* the window (yes, just like they taught us): An “Invisible Window”?! Oh, the lords of secrecy and the gods of international espionage: this is the shit! Whoever coded this crap: you should poke your eyes out and hang yourself I hope there is a really good reason for this!…
Read more ⟶

Twitter API Rate Limiting


Reading http://dev.twitter.com/pages/rate-limiting, here are the major points: REST API Anonymous calls (things like users/show - get a user’s info) are limited to 150/hour, that’s 3,600/day. This limit is IP-based. Authenticated calls (like a user’s home timeline) - 300/hour. Limit based on your app key. Those rates are useful for a single-user app (something like TweetDeck), not useful for something like an app that crawls Twitter.…
Read more ⟶

5 Tips to Make the Most out of UsabilityHub


UsabilityHub is a great tool to quickly test your application UI and flows before writing a single line of code. Here are some tips from my own experience using this tool: 1 Use variations When you’re testing various versions of the same design - use the “add variation” feature on an existing test instead of creating a new test. This will ensure that users who did the previous version of the test will not do the next version of the test.…
Read more ⟶

Any.Do


Yesterday I met with Omer Perchik who told me about his new startup Any.Do. Honesty, I amazed with what he and his partner are doing. I am usually a critical person and I dismiss ideas very easily but I have to take my hat off for these guys. What is awesome about it is the combination of: Great product idea How smooth execution looks Super solid business model…
Read more ⟶

Product Management: Micro Focus


In the previous post I talked about clearly defining a product and communicating the definition to the whole team. Once you have your product definition in place, there are two things that you control that can increase your chances to succeed: Quality of the team How well the work is aligned with the goals We’re into product management, so now I’ll talk about Micro Focus, which is making sure that the everyday work of the whole team is actually promoting the stated goal of the company.…
Read more ⟶